Positive Feedback DSD Sampler Volume 1 (2016)

Glass, Lutoslawski, Hanson, Mahler, Forrest, Wright, Khachaturian, Gershwin, Matheson, Calderwood, Adam

Lavinia Meijer, David Fung, Elinor Frey, Brian Preston, Budapest Festival Orchestra, Bill Evans, Olga Martynova (harpsichord), Hyperion Knight, Color Field Quartet, Anima, Oscar's Motet Choir

Lutoslawski, Ivan Fischer, Torsten Nilsson

Please note that these tracks are all available in 64FS DSD, tracks 2,3,5, 8 and 10 are only available in 128FS DSD, and tracks 2,3 and 8 in 256FS DSD. When purchasing this album, you will receive links to all available qualities. All in Stereo.

You can create your own DSD rate 'cocktail' by combining the tracks with different rates in one folder, just make sure your DAC can handle the different rates on the fly.

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Lavinia Meijer

Lavinia Meijer (born in South-Korea, 1983 and adopted into a Dutch family) started to play the harp at the age of 9. Within two years she was admissioned to study at the young talent class of the conservatory of Utrecht (Bachelor) and later at the conservatory of Amsterdam (Master). At both conservatories she graduated with Honours. Erika Waardenburg has been Lavinia’s principal teacher.

Her success at the conservatory of Amsterdam was a prelude on Lavinia’s career to come. She performed only contemporary compositions at her graduation concert, making a firm statement already: Lavinia is here to add new chapters to the history of music.

Besides performing the classic harp repertoire, Lavinia also experiments with electronic music, theatrical music, contemporary music, modern classics, jazz and pop. Several composers e.g. Paul Patterson (UK), Garrett Byrnes, and Jacob TV (Netherlands) have dedicated new compositions to her.

Already at a young age, Lavinia competed in several international harp competitions, winning prizes in the USA, France, Switserland, Israel, and Austria. Soon after her graduation Lavinia received the Borletti-Buitoni Trust Fellowship (London, 2006). In 2007 Lavinia was heralded as the “Rising Star” musician of her generation. She performed solo-recitals at concert halls like Musikverein (Vienna), Carnegie Hall (New York), Philharmonie (Köln), Jerusalem Theater, Seoul Arts Center, Royal Concertgebouw (Amsterdam), Cité-de-la-Musique (Paris), Konzerthus (Stockholm), and Symphony Hall (Birmingham, UK).

In 2009, at the young age of 26, Lavinia received the highest distinction for a classical musician in the Netherlands: the Dutch Music Prize. In 2011 she was the recipient of an Edison Award for her album Fantasies & Impromptus

As a featured soloist, Lavinia performed harp concertos with renowned orchestras, such as Royal Concertgebouw Chamber Orchestra Amsterdam, Israel Philharmonics, Amsterdam Sinfonietta, Noord Nederlands Orkest, and Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra. She performed with conductors such as Thierry Fischer, Frans Brüggen, Hannu Lintu, Thomas Ades and Marco Boni.

Her broad interest to find new sounds on and new compositions for the harp has let her to meet the American composer Philip Glass in 2011. He invited her to his concert in Amsterdam where she performed his Metamorphosis I-V on the harp. “You are the special effect of this evening”, he told Lavinia after the show, and he supported Lavinia to record a full album of Glass’ compostions. The result was overwhelming. Metamorphosis/The Hours received mostly 5 star reviews (not just in the Dutch press), and reached the certified Platinum status within half a year.

David Fung

Described as “stylish and articulate” in the New York Times and praised as having “undoubted talent” by the Los Angeles Times, pianist David Fung is widely recognized for playing that is elegant and refined, yet deeply poetic and intensely expressive. A top prizewinner in two of the "big five" international piano competitions (the Queen Elisabeth in Brussels and the Arthur Rubinstein in Tel Aviv), Mr. Fung has appeared as guest soloist with all the major orchestras in his native Australia, including the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, the Queensland Symphony Orchestra, and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, and internationally with such ensembles as the Israel Camerata Orchestra, the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, the Israel Symphony Orchestra, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, the National Orchestra of Belgium, the National Taiwan Symphony Orchestra, the Royal Chamber Orchestra of Wallonia, the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, the San Diego Symphony Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, and the Xiamen Philharmonic Orchestra.

A frequent guest artist of concert series and festivals throughout the world, Mr. Fung has performed at the Aspen Music Festival, Atlantic Music Festival, Bari International Music Festival in Italy, Edinburgh International Festival, Music at Menlo, Ravinia Festival, and in New York's Carnegie Hall and Merkin Hall, Los Angeles' Walt Disney Concert Hall and Royce Hall, Wigmore Hall in London, Scotland's Queen’s Hall, Belgium's La Monnaie, Toronto's Glenn Gould Studio, the Sydney Opera House, the Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels, the National Concert Hall in Taiwan, and Israel's Mann Auditorium. At his Edinburgh International Festival debut, Jonas Green of the Edinburgh Guide described Mr. Fung as being “impossibly virtuosic, prodigiously talented... and probably [doing] ten more impossible things daily before breakfast.”

Highlights of the 13/14 season include the West Coast Premiere of Chen Qigang’s Piano Concerto “Er Huang” with Lan Shui and the San Francisco Symphony, Brahms Second Piano Concerto with Marin Alsop and the National Orchestra of Belgium, Mozart Piano Concerto No. 21 in C Major with Michael Hofstetter and the Royal Chamber Orchestra, and debuts at the Ravinia Festival, the Atlantic Music Festival, Salle Henry le Boeuf at the Palais des Beaux-Arts, Flagey and La Monnaie in Belgium, the National Concert Hall in Taiwan, the EPCOR Center for the Performing Arts in Calgary, the DiMenna Center in New York, and return performances at Weill Hall at Carnegie Hall and the Bari International Music Festival in Italy. He also appeared in recital with soprano Amando Roocroft, ‘cellist Johannes Moser, violinist Geoff Nuttall, and performed newly composed works by Balint Karosi, Paul Kerekes, Michel Petrossian, Frederic Rzewski, and Christopher Theofanidis.


Elinor Frey

Fascinated with the cello’s origins and the creative process of new music, Elinor Frey plays both period and modern instruments. Frey’s honors include a US-Italy Fulbright Fellowship where she studied baroque cello with Paolo Beschi, the SSHRC Canada Graduate Scholarship, and American Musicological Society and Canada Council for the Arts grants facilitating her work on Italian cello music. In recent seasons she has performed with Ensemble Caprice, Tafelmusik, Les Idées hereuses, and Bradamante, as well as with her quartet, Pallade Musica, grand prize winners of the 2012 Early Music America Baroque Performance Competition and second prize winners in the 2014 International Van Wassenear Competition in Utrecht.

Frey’s debut album, Dialoghi, is titled for the solo piece written for her by Steven Stucky. Her two releases on the Belgian label Passacaille include the upcoming Berlin Sonatas with Lorenzo Ghielmi on fortepiano and the recent release, La voce del violoncello, praised for its “careful scholarship and brilliant layering of moods and tempos” (Toronto Star) and for the “honest, reflective beauty of her music making” (Strings). Her performance of this program was the winner of the public prize at the 2013 Utrecht Early Music Festival Fringe. Frey holds degrees from McGill, Mannes, and Juilliard.

Budapest Festival Orchestra

Ivan Fischer is founder and Music Director of the Budapest Festival Orchestra. The partnership between Iván Fischer and his Budapest Festival Orchestra has proved to be one of the greatest success stories in the past three decades of classical music. Intense international touring and a series of acclaimed recordings for Philips Classics, later for Channel Classics have contributed to Iván Fischer's reputation as one of the world's most visionary and successful orchestra leaders.

He has developed and introduced new types of concerts, "Cocoa-Concerts” for young children, "Midnight Music” concerts for students, "Surprise” concerts where the programme is not announced, "One Forint Concerts” where he talks to the audience, open-air concerts in Budapest attracting tens of thousands of people. He has founded several festivals, including a summer festival in Budapest on baroque music and the Budapest Mahlerfest which is also a forum for commissioning and presenting new compositions.

As a guest conductor Fischer works with the finest symphony orchestras of the world. He has been invited to the Berlin Philharmonic more than ten times, he leads every year two weeks of programs with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, and appears with leading US symphony orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic and the Cleveland Orchestra.

Earlier music director of Kent Opera and Lyon Opera, Principal Conductor of National Symphony Orchestra in Washington DC, his numerous recordings have won several prestigious international prizes.

Ivan Fischer studied piano, violin, cello and composition in Budapest, continuing his education in Vienna in Professor Hans Swarowsky’s conducting class. Recently he has been also active as a composer: his works have been performed in the US, Holland, Hungary, Germany and Austria, and he staged successful opera performances.

Mr. Fischer is a founder of the Hungarian Mahler Society, and Patron of the British Kodály Academy. He received the Golden Medal Award from the President of the Republic of Hungary, and the Crystal Award from the World Economic Forum for his services to help international cultural relations. The French Government named him Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres. In 2006 he was honored with the Kossuth Prize, Hungary’s most prestigious arts award. He is honorary citizen of Budapest. In 2011 he received the Royal Philharmonic Award and the Dutch Ovatie prize. In 2013 he was awarded Honorary Membership of the Royal Academy of Music in London.

As of August 2011 Ivan Fischer is music director of the Konzerthaus Berlin and principal conductor of the Konzerthausorchester Berlin.

Ivan Fischer

Ivan Fischer is founder and Music Director of the Budapest Festival Orchestra. The partnership between Iván Fischer and his Budapest Festival Orchestra has proved to be one of the greatest success stories in the past three decades of classical music. Intense international touring and a series of acclaimed recordings for Philips Classics, later for Channel Classics have contributed to Iván Fischer's reputation as one of the world's most visionary and successful orchestra leaders.

He has developed and introduced new types of concerts, "cocoa-concerts" for young children, "Midnight Music" concerts for students, "surprise" concerts where the programme is not announced, "one forint concerts" where he talks to the audience, open-air concerts in Budapest attracting tens of thousands of people. He has founded several festivals, including a summer festival in Budapest on baroque music and the Budapest Mahlerfest which is also a forum for commissioning and presenting new compositions.

As a guest conductor Fischer works with the finest symphony orchestras of the world. He has been invited to the Berlin Philharmonic more than ten times, he leads every year two weeks of programs with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, and appears with leading US symphony orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic and the Cleveland Orchestra.

Earlier music director of Kent Opera and Lyon Opera, Principal Conductor of National Symphony Orchestra in Washington DC, his numerous recordings have won several prestigious international prizes.

Ivan Fischer studied piano, violin, cello and composition in Budapest, continuing his education in Vienna in Professor Hans Swarowsky’s conducting class. Recently he has been also active as a composer: his works have been performed in the US, Holland, Hungary, Germany and Austria, and he staged successful opera performances.

Mr. Fischer is a founder of the Hungarian Mahler Society, and Patron of the British Kodály Academy. He received the Golden Medal Award from the President of the Republic of Hungary, and the Crystal Award from the World Economic Forum for his services to help international cultural relations. The French Government named him Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres. In 2006 he was honored with the Kossuth Prize, Hungary’s most prestigious arts award. He is honorary citizen of Budapest. In 2011 he received the Royal Philharmonic Award and the Dutch Ovatie prize. In 2013 he was awarded Honorary Membership of the Royal Academy of Music in London.

As of August 2011 Ivan Fischer is music director of the Konzerthaus Berlin and principal conductor of the Konzerthausorchester Berlin.

Bill Evans

Evans was born in Plainfield, New Jersey and attended Southeastern Louisiana University. After a period in the Army, he returned to New York in 1955 and began working and recording with Tony Scott and George Russell. His subtly swinging, lucidly constructed solos with these leaders quickly attracted attention, and provided Evans with an opportunity to begin recording under his own name; but he was modest regarding his gifts, and for a time was reluctant to push himself into the limelight. All this changed after he spent several months during 1958 in Miles Davis's band, where he played alongside John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley as well as the trumpeter and became a central figure in Davis's shift to modal improvisation.

The period with Davis allowed Evans to organize his own trio, which featured bassist Scott LaFaro and drummer Paul Motian by the end of 1959. These three players developed a new and more interactive approach to trio playing, one in which all instruments carried melodic responsibilities and functioned as equal voices. LaFaro's tragic death in a July 1961 highway accident ended the existence of this seminal unit; but not before it had recorded four albums, two in the studio and two at a Village Vanguard performance shortly before the bassist's death, that influenced several generations of pianists, bassists, and drummers.

Hyperion Knight

HYPERION KNIGHT was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay area. He started piano lessons at the age of 4, and debued professionally at 14 in San Rafael, California, playing Beethoven’s Fourth Piano Concerto. While studying with Nathan Schwartz in San Francisco, Knight received his Bachelor of Music degree from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. He moved to Cleveland and continued his studies, this time with Eunice Podis. His Master of Arts degree was earned from the Cleveland Institute of Music. At the age of 22, Hyperion Knight received his Doctor of Musical Arts from the Cleveland Institute of Music. Appropriate to this recording, his dissertation was on the Beethoven’s “Waldstein” Piano Sonata. In 1983 he was appointed principal pianist with the Erie Philharmonic Orchestra.

Color Field Quartet

Chicago Symphony Orchestra violinist Baird Dodge and a few friends created Color Field, a flexible ensemble that can morph between two instruments and a small chamber orchestra to play repertoire musically interesting and challenging to the musicians.  For our concert and recording sessions, Color Field was Baird Dodge and Gina Dibello on violins, Weijing Wang on viola and Yi Xin on cello.  Baird, Gina and Weijing are all members of Chicago Symphony Orchestra (Baird serves as principal second violin), and Yi Xin sometimes plays cello in the orchestra for the Lyric Opera of Chicago.  If anyone doubts his operatic lyricism, they need only listen to the sensitive approach Yi takes to his “aria” in the first movement of Matheson’s quartet.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts was so pleased with Color Field's talent and professionalism during their first performances in Samueli Theater that he invited Color Field to open Segerstrom's chamber music series in the 2018 season.   

The James Matheson String Quartet was commissioned by J and Helen Schlichting.  Here are J’s thoughts on the magic of this collaboration with Baird and with Jim: 

“Although this recording celebrates the wonderful music of James Matheson, Baird Dodge was the secret force that enabled the whole enterprise to reach fruition.  The Violin Concerto was written for him.  He played the premiere performance that is memorialized here.  A streamed recording of that performance that was briefly available on the Chicago Symphony Orchestra website was what convinced me to pursue Jim for our first commissioning project.  Baird is a key player in Color Field, the wonderful quartet who perform Jim's piece brilliantly in this recording.  Baird and I enjoy the serendipity involved in projects like this, the collision of happy and odd events, often over a long period of time, that magically result in a wonderful work of art.  But serendipity by itself is not enough.  A 'special sauce' is needed to bring it all together.  From my view, Baird is just that.  Thank you, Baird.”

Photo: Cooper Bates 

Ali Calderwood

Anima is a UK based duo comprising of producer / composer / multi-instrumentalist, Ali Calderwood and vocalist / songwriter, Daniela Broder.

As independent artists and a duo, Anima have forged an engaging new style of music blending rich, meditative soundscapes, ethereal, mezzo-soprano vocals, sacred and ancient chants, with a variety of world instruments and healing frequencies. Through exquisitely crafted recordings, Anima weave alluring tapestries of sound and vibration that touch the heart and soul, moving the listener into deep states of stillness, peace and presence.

Both Ali and Daniela have been involved with music from an early age, and along with studies in the arts and natural medicine, they have spent a number of years within different parts of the world learning from indigenous elders and teachers in the ancient healing arts.

Ali began producing music under the name Anima in 2004, releasing his debut album “Celestial Baptism”. The same year, Ali and Daniela met in Bath, Somerset, and the following year while individually travelling in Mexico, they began performing music together. Their journey then led to them living together in the Peruvian Amazon and the Andes in Bolivia, where they began working on their first joint album “Lemuria Emerging”, which was released in 2007.  As of 2014, Anima have released 13 albums, including the highly acclaimed “Sound Medicine”. A number of their tracks, and other commissioned pieces have been featured in films and used in best-selling guided meditation CDs. Their album “Light of Aluna” won an IMA award for best New Age Music album 2013. In 2014, Anima began recording and re-recording a number of their albums in DSD and SACD format, which include “Sacred Alliance”, “Sound Medicine HD” and “Temple of the Heart HD”.

Their live concerts have been hosted by some prestigious venues and events around the UK and in Europe. They continue to offer “Sound Healing Concerts”, as well as facilitate retreats and workshops in the UK.

Anima are based in the Highlands of Scotland, in a remote location. Energy for creating music is provided through renewable energy resources of water and sunlight, and food is grown on the land in harmony with the natural rhythms and cycles. Anima is a word found in various languages and cultures, that means soul, breath, air, life force and feminine spirit energy, and it is this sacred energy that inspires their work.

“The precious time that we have spent immersed within the indigenous ways of life and their living connection to the world of spirit, has deeply enriched our lives, and reawakened our natural ability to connect and work with the healing energies of Nature. It’s this connection that is imbued within the music that we create, and infuses it with a kind of magnetic quality that affects and touches people, and brings about healing experiences that our music is known for."

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Positive Feedback DSD Sampler Volume 1 (2016)

Glass, Lutoslawski, Hanson, Mahler, Forrest, Wright, Khachaturian, Gershwin, Matheson, Calderwood, Adam

Lavinia Meijer, David Fung, Elinor Frey, Brian Preston, Budapest Festival Orchestra, Bill Evans, Olga Martynova (harpsichord), Hyperion Knight, Color Field Quartet, Anima, Oscar's Motet Choir

    Audiostream about Track 10

When the choir, brass, and organ played together, the sonic result was spectacular given the bloom and dimensionality of the recording.

[read full review]

    Cygnus Review Magazine about Track 09

Don’t you just love those magical moments in your life when you pick up a book, or hear a piece of music that touches your very core? It resonates so deeply within you that it gives the impression that the author/composer knows exactly how you are feeling/thinking/being at this particular time, and a connection is made through their words or music that simply ripples throughout your entire being. Well, listening to this album was one of those moments. For me, this album is not to be explained but to be experienced and I truly do hope that your experience of this album is just as magical for you.

Cygnus Review Magazine

    Andrew Quint from The Absolute Sound about Track 08

(...) All of Matheson’s music has a bold, cinematic flair. His writing for solo violin is highly idiomatic and virtuosic; the orchestral contribution is extravagantly colorful. Matheson employs an advanced tonal syntax and confidently cites other styles as he makes his argument: the central Chaconne of the Concerto references the slow movement from Mahler’s Sixth Symphony and the energetic finale strongly suggests bluegrass. (...) The concerto recording scales the solo instrument correctly and the orchestral sonority is luminous. Times Alone captures the impressive dynamic power of soprano Laura Strickling and massive, dimensional piano sound.

Andrew Quint[read full review]

    The Washington Post about track 04

A beautiful performance - majestic but intimate, sweeping but tender, carefully planned and brilliantly executed… This is one of the best recordings of the 'Resurrection' Symphony ever made worthy to stand with the very different performances by Otto Klemperer and Leonard Bernstein. (…)

    Robert H. Levi from Positive Feedback about track 02

The sonics are world class. DG, EMI, Decca, and BMG should take notice! Yarlung is here to stay. Performance A Sound A+

Robert H. Levi

    SACD.NET about Track 06

It turns out to be breathtakingly good. Although seemingly none of the pieces were written with the harpsichord in mind, they sound just right. The tone of the French Von Nagel harpsichord is gorgeous - the deep notes sounding particularly magical. A disc veritably bulging with highlights - the Shostakovich Fugue in A minor, the Khachaturian, the Mendelssohn (Wow!), the Schubert, the Cramer (Wow!), the Schumann - especially Mignon. Everything was selected by Olga - it's a wonderful collection. I've played only the surround program. The sound quality is to die for.

Fibonacci[read full review]

    The Guardian about track 05 -

This enthralling session by the late Bill Evans (a crucial pianistic influence on stars from McCoy Tyner and Herbie Hancock to Chick Corea, Keith Jarrett and Brad Mehldau) was recorded five days after a famous performance at the 1968 Montreux jazz festival by Evans, bassist Eddie Gomez and drummer Jack DeJohnette. Verve’s Montreux live recording won a Grammy, but this studio session has been in the vaults ever since. DeJohnette, who spent only six months with Evans (Some Other Time thus becomes only the second album to document the partnership) and would go on to play on Miles Davis’s Bitches Brew the next year, was a more elementally forceful drummer than the pianist usually employed – but his fire and his robust tenderness affected Evans’s attitude to drums from then on. DeJohnette the cymbal texturalist is in evidence on classics such as On Green Dolphin Street and In a Sentimental Mood, and the drummer’s more muscular intensity pushes the leader into controlled abandon on How About You? The album is not only exquisite jazz playing, but a document of a step-change in the great Bill Evans’s trio conception. 4 Stars

John Fordham[read full review]

    Classical Net's Steve Schwartz about track 03

"(...)The lush opening measures of Nymphs and Satyrs require a suspension of disbelief: Hanson first intended the music for solo clarinet. The piece yet again is flat-out gorgeous, but its very lyricism militates against anyone dancing to it. As a composer, Hanson sings rather than dances. To me, it's a tone poem in three short movements, the most delightful being the scherzo second movement. (...)"

Classical Net[read full review]

    Audiophile Audition about track 01

All five movements of Glass’ 1988 Metamorphosis transcribe perfectly to harp (...) the harp brings out some sonorities in the music that are quite different from the piano. The dynamic range on some selections is quite wide, which you wouldn’t expect from a solo instrument. (...)

Audiophile Audition

Positive Feedback DSD Sampler Volume 1 (2016)

Glass, Lutoslawski, Hanson, Mahler, Forrest, Wright, Khachaturian, Gershwin, Matheson, Calderwood, Adam

Lavinia Meijer, David Fung, Elinor Frey, Brian Preston, Budapest Festival Orchestra, Bill Evans, Olga Martynova (harpsichord), Hyperion Knight, Color Field Quartet, Anima, Oscar's Motet Choir

Note: For the technical specifications of each track please navigate to the album page of the track by clicking on the trackname in the tracklisting. Then, on the album page you can check out the tech specs tab for the album which the track originates from.




This release uses ’Simple Album Pricing’. You will have access to all rates and channel structures available for each track within the release. Please note that during checkout only the highest available DSD rate will be displayed.
Album Download duration price
NDSD006: Positive Feedback DSD Sampler Volume 1
01:28:01  
Tracks.
1.
Opening Piece From Glassworks (from 33912) DSD64
Glass
00:03:50   N/A
2.
Grave Metamorphoses for Cello and Piano (from YAR78876DSD) DSD64, DSD128, DSD256
Lutoslawski
00:05:41   N/A
3.
Two Yuletide Pieces for Piano Solo (from HDDLTroy129) DSD64, DSD128, DSD256
Hanson
00:05:20   N/A
4.
Allegro Maestoso (from 23506) DSD64
Mahler
00:21:03   N/A
5.
Baubles, Bangles and Beads (from 2XHDRE1044) DSD64, DSD128
Forrest,Wright
00:04:51   N/A
6.
Invention (from Album for Children) (from CM0102006) DSD64
Khachaturian
00:02:39   N/A
7.
Rhapsody in Blue (version for piano) (from Wilson9231) DSD64
Gershwin
00:13:51   N/A
8.
String Quartet - Quick, breathless (from YAR25670DSD) DSD64, DSD128, DSD256
Matheson
00:05:04   N/A
9.
Earth Wisdom (396 Hz) (from ANCD12) DSD64
Calderwood
00:10:58   N/A
10.
Cantique de Noel (O Holy Night) (Sung in Swedish) (from 812864019605) DSD64, DSD128
Adam
00:04:12   N/A

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